Monday, April 6, 2015

Ask the Authors and Giveaway!

Happy Monday! It's time for a giveaway and today we have with us three lovely Authors. Sherry Harris, Terrie Moran and Linda O. Johnston . Have a question for these lovely authors? Ask here in the comments and at the end of the day three lucky readers will win a Tee- shirt from Terrie Moran and a book by Sherry Harris and Linda O Johnston. (leave email so we can let you know if you win)


                                             


Lost Under a Ladder by Linda O. Johnston


Is it Luck? Or is it Destiny?

Rory Chasen never thought superstitions were real—until her beloved fiancĂ© is killed after walking under a ladder. To find closure and the truth about superstitions, Rory takes her dog Pluckie to a town called Destiny, where superstitious beliefs are a way of life.
Rory’s visit to Destiny takes an unexpected turn when Pluckie saves Martha, the owner of the Lucky Dog Boutique. While Martha recovers, Rory reluctantly agrees to manage the pet shop for her. But when Martha becomes the prime suspect in the local bookshop owner’s murder, Rory can’t believe that the sweet old woman would do it. Convinced the real killer is still roaming Destiny’s streets, Rory resolves to crack the case before Martha’s luck runs out.
Praise:
"Doggone cute."—LIBRARY JOURNAL


Tagged for Death by Sherry Harris


Starting your life over at age thirty-eight isn't easy, but that's what Sarah Winston finds herself facing when her husband CJ runs off with a 19-year-old temptress named Tiffany. Sarah's self-prescribed therapy happily involves hitting all the garage and tag sales in and around her small town of Ellington, Massachusetts. If only she could turn her love for bargain hunting into a full-time career.


One man's junk is another man's treasure


But after returning from a particularly successful day searching for yard sale treasures, Sarah finds a grisly surprise in one of her bags: a freshly bloodied shirt. . .that undoubtedly belongs to her ex, CJ, who now happens to be Ellington's chief of police. If that's not bad enough, it seems Tiffany has gone missing. Now it's up to Sarah to prove that her cold-hearted ex is not a cold-blooded killer. . .


But finding that treasure can be murder.




Well Read then Dead by Terrie Farley Moran


First in a new series!


Nestled in the barrier islands of Florida’s Gulf Coast, Fort Myers Beach is home to Mary “Sassy” Cabot and Bridget Mayfield—owners of the bookstore cafĂ©, Read ’Em and Eat. But when they’re not dishing about books or serving up scones, Sassy and Bridgy are keeping tabs on hard-boiled murder.


Read ’Em and Eat is known for its delicious breakfast and lunch treats, along with quite a colorful clientele. If it’s not Rowena Gustavson loudly debating the merits of the current book club selection, it’s Miss Augusta Maddox lecturing tourists on rumors of sunken treasure among the islands. It’s no wonder Sassy’s favorite is Delia Batson, a regular at the Emily Dickinson table. Augusta’s cousin and best friend Delia is painfully shy—which makes the news of her murder all the more shocking.


No one is more distraught than Augusta, and Sassy wants to help any way she can. But Augusta doesn’t have time for sympathy. She wants Delia’s killer found—and she’s not taking no for an answer. Now Sassy is on the case, and she’d better act fast before there’s any more trouble in paradise.


Includes a buttermilk pie recipe!




61 comments:

  1. A question for Linda: Do you plan to write any additional books in either the pet rescue or pet sitter mystery series?

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    1. Hi, servedogmom,
      No further Kendra Ballantyne, Pet-Sitter, or Pet Rescue books are planned at this time, partly because I'm currently writing four other series. But Kendra and Lauren keep talking to me now and then, so I'll never say never! Thanks for asking.

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  2. My question is for all three authors. If you could bring one of you characters to life, who would it be and why?
    angelhwk68@yahoo.com

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    1. Hmmmm, interesting question -- I think I'd bring Angelo to life. He's feisty and a great cook, but also has a heart of gold. Okay or maybe Seth -- he's hot but that sounds so shallow.

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    2. I love all the "regulars" who hang out at the Read 'Em and Eat but if I brought one to life it would probably be Aunt Ophie, just for the pure entertainment of watching her spin around on her impossibly high heels.

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    3. I must have missed some of the posts before. I'd love to bring Rory Chasen to life and talk to her about superstitions and mysteries. I'd also enjoy talking to the protagonist of my earlier Pet-Sitter Mysteries, since Kendra Ballantyne's a lawyer, and so was I, she lives in the same area as I do, and she also has a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Lexie! I'd also love to talk to Carrie Kennersly, who'll be in my upcoming Barkery & Biscuits Mysteries since she's a veterinary technician as well as a baker of human and dog treats. And Lauren Vancouver, who's a pet rescuer. And--well, I'd love to meet all my characters!

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    4. Loving all the questions! Thanks for responding!

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  3. Question: who or whom do you base any of your characters? Real life people you know or imaginary? jslbrown2009(at)aol(dot)com

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    1. Hi, Lisa! I realized when I was answering the question above that I have several characters that are based on real people and then exaggerated. In Tagged for Death Angelo is based on a former neighbor -- I use some of his stories in the book. But the real life Angelo doesn't cook and is a bit lower key than my version. Angelo is one of my favorite characters.

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    2. Hi Lisa, my characters are totally imaginary. I invent people I'd like to know in real life. That means they have to be quirky and entertaining. (You should meet my actual friends!) Then I surround the characters with folks who they (and I) find to be engaging or annoying but never boring.

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    3. My characters are imaginary. However, as I said, the protagonist of my Pet-Sitter Mysteries, Kendra Ballantyne, had a lot in common with me. I never had my law license jeopardized by an alleged ethics violation, though... fortunately!

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  4. Hi Shelley, thanks so much for inviting me to play today along with Linda and Sherry. I'm going to toddle off to a double medical appointment now but I will be back later. Keep the questions coming!

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  5. My question is for everyone: Do the stories need to have a crime of murder, or would any crime be worth a cozy mystery story? I love cozy mysteries but I would think it would be hard to kill off so many people, especially in a small town setting.

    ElaineE246(at)msn(dot)com

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    1. That is a great question as I ponder plots for the next book. Most cozies have a murder but I don't mind books that have theft or assaults instead. Readers have to suspend belief in a long running series. No one would want to live in Cabot Cove but everyone would want to be friends with Jessica Fletcher.

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    2. Thanks! I did really like the "Murder, She Wrote" episodes that were in Cabot Cove the best, but, yeah, you hate to kill off all the friendly people that live there. I suppose it is easier if the setting is in a larger city. But I think the stories would be good, even if the crime were a robbery with no murder or something like that. Still a mystery to solve!

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    3. Elaine--Shelly nailed it with the Cabot Cove analogy. And Cabot Cove did have a lot of visitors--and some of them murdered or were murdered. The Read 'Em and Eat mysteries are set in Fort Myers Beach, Florida, a town that attracts tourists year 'round, so murders won't depopulate the town. Having said that, I think any serious crime would work but I suspect that publishers want the seriousness of a murder.

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    4. I sometimes have crimes in addition to murder in my stories and certainly would be willing to use a serious (but cozy) crime instead of a murder. I've set both of my two current mystery series in fairly small towns but both attract visitors for different reasons, so it doesn't necessarily need to be a local who's killed. My two prior series took place in L.A. so it was easy to find local newbies to the stories to kill off.

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    5. And, sometimes, there just are people you want to kill off! ;-)

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  6. What a great morning we are having with these lovely ladies.

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    1. Thanks for having us, Shelley! Great questions from your readers!

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    2. Thanks for inviting me, Shelley! It's a pleasure to be with this group and to get such fun questions.

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  7. This is for all of the ladies, What comes first the title or the story and who decides what the cover should look like? Thanks for providing this opportunity to look inside the creative side of writing. robeader53@yahoo.com

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    1. The story has come first for me with the garage sale series. My editor changed the name of the second two books while I was writing them. I get to give my editor ideas for the covers. I suggested having the sales tag on them but then the artist takes over.

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    2. I write both short mystery fiction and cozy novels and with one short story exception, the story always comes first for me. In fact, I did not know what to call Well Read, Then Dead until it was finished and ready to be sent out by my agent.

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    3. The story comes first for me, too. I sometimes struggle with the title and sometimes come up with just the right one. Other times, they get changed during the editorial process. I've never had a title I disliked, though. I currently get to see initial ideas for my mystery covers and make suggestions.

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  8. My question is for all of the authors. I often snack as I read so I wondered do you snack as you write? All of the books sounds great and thank you for the chance. woodrumbetty@gmail.com

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    1. Maybe some chocolate while I write but greasy fingers and keyboards don't go well together!

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    2. I drink water and iced green tea all day long. As to food, when I am closing in on a great scene or a deadline (or hopefully both) I have been known to eat my meals while working. A really bad habit. :)

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    3. I do sometimes snack as I write, or I take a lunch break. It's harder not to snack while I'm writing stories for my next new series, the Barkery and Biscuits Mysteries, in which my protagonist runs both a bakery for human treats and a barkery for doggy treats. The first one, Bite the Biscuit, comes out in May, and I'm now working on #2.

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  9. What authors would you like to meet, alive or passed away? saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. One of the fun things about writing is the networking with other authors. As a member of different writing organizations such as Sisters in Crime, Mystery Writers of America and Romance Writers of America, I attend a lot of meetings and conferences and fortunately get to meet some of the writers whose work I particularly enjoy reading.

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    2. Daphne du Maurier. Her ability to tell a story in beautifully written prose captured my heart decades ago. I'd love to talk to her about how she researched the books that took place hundreds of years ago.

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    3. Phyllis Whitney -- I loved her novels when I was younger. And Maud Hart Lovelace -- I grew up with her books.

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  10. I don't really have a question. I just stand amazed as I read these books and try to imagine doing all of the dialogue and keeping people on the straight-and-narrow. Don't want one of the characters to take off in a different direction from the beginning of the book. I envy you the ability. I'll just keep reading and you can keep writing. thanks. txmlhl@yahoo.com

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    1. Thanks, Mary. I sometimes do have mental conversations with some of those characters who tell me the directions they want to go!

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    2. In Tagged for Death I have a character that originally was going to be in one scene with no name. Then he suddenly had a name and showed back up in another scene. Now he's in book two and three!

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    3. Oh Mary, you are so kind. Linda's right, characters do have a way of letting the writer know what they want to do which might not sync with what the writer thinks should happen. Still, it pays to listen. I think persistence is the key. Sit butt in chair and write, rewrite and rewrite again! Thanks for your kind words.

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  11. Where is your favorite ever vacation spot? for all the authors. Thanks. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. At the present moment I would say Orlando because I was lucky enough to spend a vacation there in 2014 with my children and all my grandchildren. I've been to Ireland a few times really feel at home there, which is one reason I love Sheila Connolly's County Cork books.

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    2. I always enjoy cruises. My favorite vacation spot ever, though, is London since on my first trip there I met my first Cavalier King Charles Spaniel!

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    3. That's a hard one -- I love Maine and Monterrey, California. I've been to London once but fell in love with it at hope to go back some day soon!

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  12. (sorry if this is duplicate - first try disappeared!)
    How hard is it to balance your writing time with having to do so much publicity on your own? I enjoyed meeting and talking with Terrie at Bouchercon, and all the authors I have met are very gracious and generous with their time. But . . . it must be hard to be productive and also make sure readers know who you are? I must say I enjoy the interviews and blogging almost as much as the books.

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    1. Bouchercon! Always a great experience, isn't it? And I sometimes think if I didn't attend a few cons a year, I'd never leave my house. It is hard to balance writing, publicity and then there is my real life.All days are busy. Laura Childs once mentioned in an interview that she divides her time by days--this many days in a week to writing, this many days to PR depending on where she is in the cycle. And she has three terrific best-selling series. I thought it was great advice. I am still trying to figure out how to follow it. LOL! I do think that I work best when I know what the week ahead will bring: how many words written, how many PR commitments must be kept. But then stuff happens--and I am a V-e-r-y slow writer so eight hour days can quickly become eleven hour days. The internet has made publicity easier. Interviews and blogging, maintaining my website and my author FB page don't require travel and that saves oodles of time. Thanks so much for you interest. xoxoxo

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    2. I enjoyed Bouchercon, too, and will be at Malice Domestic again this year. And yes, blogging and other social media and promotion are lots of fun but take up a lot of time. Speaking of which--time for me to get back to work!

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    3. I'm looking forward to going to my first Bouchercon this year. But I usually attend Malice Domestic and Crime Bake. Like Terrie and Linda said it can be hard to find a balance -- I'm an extrovert and like talking to people so staying in a room with a computer can be a challenge!

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  13. All three of the books look great! I wonder if all three of you grew up reading mysteries and that's how you decided to write them?! I sure read my share of Nancy Drew etc as a kid and certainly that's a big reason why I love to read them now! Thanks!
    JHolden955(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Hi. Yes. I did read Nancy Drew, Judy Bolton, Trixie Belden etc. I also read the NY Daily News, the Daily Mirror and the Journal American from the time I was about nine or ten. There was a certain true crime element to that. In addition we were allowed to read any adult book that was in the house--my parents were great readers--so I have very eclectic taste in reading. My favorites were golden age mysteries and any non-fiction relating to American history. Some where in the 1980s I developed an attachment to cozy mysteries and decided that someday I would write one. and decades later I did. My short fiction is also mysteries but far from cozy.

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    2. I read Nancy Drew, too. I also read romantic suspense books, and I always enjoy putting an element of romance in my mysteries and suspense in my romances. I'm sure that reading a lot when I was young inspired me to write a lot now that I'm older!

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    3. I started with the Bobbsey Twins and then on to Nancy Drew. Then on to Phyllis Whitney, Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt. I can't imagine writing anything but mysteries. Like Linda, I like a little romance with my mystery -- reading or writing.

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  14. Do any of you have a lot of input into the covers for your books or do the editors, publishers make those decisions?
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com

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    1. I do have input. Before my editor meets with the Art Department at Berkley, she asks for my ideas. Then they send me a copy of the cover for approval. I have been lucky in that they have accommodated the changes I have requested. For example Caught Read-Handed which will be out in July is presently up on all the sales venue with white walls and a wooden bench. The final cover which will show up soon will have blue walls and a yellow bench, giving it a much cozier look. It is the direct result of my agent supporting me and my editor going to bat for me. The team at Berkley is very collaborative.

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    2. I do have some input into my covers, which is a lot of fun. And I've also been very fortunate in getting some really good covers.

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    3. I answered this once but it seems to have disappeared! My editor at Kensington asked for my ideas. I suggested having an old fashion sales tag since my protagonist loves yard sales. They incorporated the idea and the first two covers look fabulous!

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  15. Ladies: who was your first celebrity crush?!?!?
    mine was Donny Osmond.....did I just 'date' myself???? LOL!!!

    cyn209 at juno dot com

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    1. Cyn, as long as I'm around, you couldn't possibly date yourself. Preteen my first crush was Roy Rogers or Hopalong Cassidy. I forget who was first. As a teenager, it was probably the Beatles as a group, with George Harrison in the lead. Donny Osmond--Ha-- you are a babe in arms. ;)

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    2. I agree with Terrie -- you are a baby. I think mine were Paul McCartney and Davy Jones. Oh, those British accents!

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  16. What an awesome time we had today! I loves this feature and hope to do it again.

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    1. It was really fun, Shelley! Thanks so much!

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  17. I had a great time. Thanks for inviting me and special thanks to the folks who stopped by to ask questions!

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  18. What a great day! Winners are J Holden, Elaine K, Robeader!! Congratulations!!

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